The European Social Network (ESN) has put together a practice repository, which aims to provide its members and the interested public with an insight into the field of social services across a range of target groups and themes. ESN considers the dissemination of practices a crucial ingredient for the sharing of expertise on social policies and services across Europe and gathers its practices from a number of areas and working methods, including working groups, projects, peer reviews, seminars and conferences.

Collected practices are described by ESN’s policy officers using a standardised and agreed template with social care professionals submitting their practices. These practices are marked by the tag “Descriptive”. In addition to practice collection, ESN also reviews a number a practices in the framework of our ongoing working groups. These practices are marked by the tag “Analysed”. Reviewed practices have been analysed by an applied researcher working alongside social care professionals in the framework of our working groups on the basis of criteria, such as evaluation methods, transferability and sustainability.

Search for resources in our library using one or more of the drop down fields below, alternatively you can choose to browse all items.

  • The team works with young people aged 16-25 to develop individual plans which cover different aspects of their life such as education, employment, health, financial, home life, and social situation.

  • The service supports children and young people placed in out-of-home care with individual care plans, with coordination with other services ensuring an integrated approach.

  • More integrated support for children that promotes their best interest is being implemented by closer coordination between child protection and other services.

  • This Inter-sectoral Working Group operates at national level to embed a sense of shared responsibility and better understanding of roles between different sectors who work with children.

  • This project started at national level supports bottom-up approaches to integrated support for children by encouraging knowledge sharing between different local projects and by providing educational opportunities to staff in the local projects.

  • The Best for Every Child model implements a structure for improved coordination between social services, health services, education, and police. It is based on the transfer of principles of Getting it Right for Every Child in Scotland.

  • This project aims to promote better coordination between childcare and other children's services, to ensure a smooth transition for families from antenatal services to school.

  • This national plan involves a preventative and integrated approach to working with children at risk through multi-disciplinary teams, and is implemented by local authorities.

  • The P.U.E.R.I project implements a personalised reception system for unaccompanied children. It includes a multi-disciplinary team and has helped to prevent the disappearance of children from reception centres.

  • The family centre model creates local networks for child and family services so that professionals respond together to the needs of each family, rather than making families seek out each service separately.

  • More coordinated responses to children will be enabled by bringing together health, social, and education professionals. They will jointly create family plans, have shared understanding of when a child is at risk, and receive training on working with vulnerable families.

  • Earlier identification and cooperation in cases where children have developmental disorders is enabled through a coordination protocol between education, health, and social services

  • The Go Team includes social workers who work intensively with vulnerable families in an integrated way by addressing their multiple issues and supporting their access to different services.

  • By placing social workers in schools the identification of vulnerable children is improved and more integrated support can be provided to families.

  • This project supports prison inmates in the development of their personal, social, and employment skills. A mutli-disciplinary team helps to create personalised plans with the inmates and continued support is provided once they leave prison. The project has reached 384 people, and shown success with 80% of inmates not reoffending.

  • The City of Aarhus is challenging conventional welfare services by empowering users. This project is one example, with 100 long-term unemployed people given grants of €6,700 to spend as they see fit. This recognises people as experts in their own lives, and has enabled them to start businesses, gain qualifications and gain skills.

  • People with disabilities are provided with tailored support to raise their aspirations and develop pathways to independence, with 300 finding employment since the start of the programme. The programme involves an unprecedented partnership with 50 local community organisations and businesses to provide a variety of opportunities.

  • In 2016, the Welfare Department of the City of Riga decided to promote employment for socially excluded groups by financing social enterprises, NGOs and foundations.The Welfare Department created grants of €7,000 to finance beneficiaries for 12 months. The overall goal of the project is the creation of new jobs for socially excluded people with complex needs or improvement of skills and training for people who already have a job but need more support.

  • The project aims to assist beneficiaries to achieve social inclusion through innovation and integrated social services. For beneficiaries that are able to work, the most effective way to achieve social inclusion is to secure employment so that they can gradually sustain their households without the need of social welfare.

  • In 2016, the City of Vienna Department of Social Welfare, the Department for Social and Public Health and the Employment Service launched the pilot project ‘Back to the Future- Employment’.The project is implemented by two organisations based in Vienna who have connections with employers: Start Working and Craft Jobs. The project aims to help 200 young people (aged 18-24) who are minimum income recipients by successfully integrating them into the labour market.

  • The municipality of Östersund aim is to introduce digital tools which can support vulnerable people in the municipality to live more independently, whilst making more efficient use of professional’s time which can lead to cost-savings.

  • In Andalucía, Spain, an online platform has been developed to promote early intervention which will make a huge difference to the overall quality of services provided for young children with developmental difficulties.

  • Dolmen, an NGO and social services provider, supports the transition of adults with learning disabilities from institutional residences to community based housing, through three interconnected types of housing.

  • CURANT is a cohousing project for unaccompanied young refugees who live together with Flemish young people, ‘buddies’ for at least one year.

  • Since 2012, the project (Folk High Schools FHS) gives the opportunity to unaccompanied migrant young people aged 18 to 21 year old to live and study at FHS across Sweden

  • In a context of an ageing society, the integration of health and care is a way to make more efficient and effective use of limited resources and is believed to be central to the challenge of improving outcomes for patients and service users.

  • The implementation of the PIAISS has highlighted the need to develop the current health care model into a comprehensive and integrated system of health care from a dual perspective – health and social care – with a single vision.

  • Jenny's Diary is a free booklet and a set of postcards aimed at guiding conversations between professionals and people with learning disabilities on dementia, and methods to support them.

  • LAFOS is a collaboration between the Public Employment Services (PES), local social and health services and the national social insurance institution. Professionals are using IT-based databases to exchange user-related data.

  • The managers of Gaiļezers wanted to involve volunteers, students and others in order to diversify leisure activities and enrich interaction possibilities for clients.

  • The initiative covers the Borough of Sefton, in north-west England, and is composed of a number of strands which contribute to developing the workforce and providing support for individuals living with dementia and their carers.

  • It is a strategy aimed at bringing active ageing policies closer to the senior citizens, as well as enabling them to participate in the decision-making process.

  • This practice aims to the social inclusion and access to mainstream employment of people with learning disabilities, in a step by step method and through cultural activities and training, such as dancing and acting.

  • ‘Diswork’ is a paradigm shift with a demand-driven approach, starting with the employer’s needs. Employers, social services and service providers are advised and coached on how to create new sustainable jobs for people with disabities

  • The purpose of the seniors office is to inform people about activities that they could get involved in despite being older and possibly frail.

  • Through group workshops and trainings, the programme provides multiple forms of support to prepare the young people for their transition into an independent life and to improve their inclusion on the labour market.

  • “Espai Cabestany” is a programme for children and young people in care and those leaving the care system. The programme was initiated to provide a new kind of service to this specific target group and intends to better meet their needs.

  • Kotitori (in Finnish: Kotitori – palveluintegraattori) is a platform for the integration of older people’s health and social care.

  • Talent2Work is an initiative carried out in the Langstraat area in the south of the Netherlands. Organised by the Municipality of Heusden, providers of social services, local entrepreneurs. It aims to connect people looking for work within social care.

  • Obligatory self-monitoring is in place for all public and private care services, who have to develop a self-monitoring plan in cooperation with the staff. Valvira provided the guidelines and a template for developing the planfor older people in Finland.

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